Reading/Writing

Week 1 Jan 9-15

Ice Breaker Week

  • No Reading (just order the Shaunghessy book, set up blog, and say hello and describe a cool classroom experience in FB)

Blog—by Sunday at noon (that’s Jan 15)

  • Set up blog
  • Write first blog post (icebreaker)
  • Create visual rhetoric for the blog, using fun pirate-y images—change out pictures to be more like what you want your theme to be, play with widgets and figure out how you want your blog to look so it’s easy for everyone to find information. Watch some more tutorial videos so you can really get comfy in this environment.
  • Add a “links” blogroll to your blog including everyone’s blog names and the right links to their URLs—try to have this very handy for you, in a location on your fist page, so you can easily get connected to whoever you need to!
  • In all blog posts, I expect you to uphold academic standards by acknowledging all quotations or images and attributing from where or whom you got that information/image. Academic honesty=good ethics.

Facebook—by Sunday at noon (with all the likes and/or responses) (Jan 15)

  • Write first FB post (icebreaker)(many of you have done this already!)
  • “Like” everyone’s posts—always. Even if you don’t have to respond to anyone in particular. Everyone likes getting a “like”—so do that at minimum.
  • But do respond to everyone’s ice breaker posts by Sunday at noon—say something about how you can relate, or how that’s cool, or how you’re looking forward to the class… Something friendly and to get you in the habit of interacting, not just glancing at what’s been written.
  • Academic standards apply—be clear about where you get something: text or image.

Reflections due in Blackboard

  • NOT THIS WEEK. But from now on. Please be sure that you properly attribute where you get text or images. (Details below for the first of these reflective assignments.)

DUE DATES AND TIMES FROM NOW ON:

  • Blog posts by Thursdays at noon
  • FB posts by by Sunday at 8pm–but please do these as you can anytime. FB is a place to have a great conversation. Do that.
  • Responses to peers’ blog posts and FB posts by Sunday at 8 pm
  • BB Reflections by Sunday at 8 pm

My responses to you and for you:

  • I will post something in my blog about what I want you to focus on in your blogs regarding the readings and/or FB. Or my blog post will be a mini-lecture-like-thing that muses upon some important related topic. I should post by Monday night every week. Occasionally, I’ll post Tuesday mornings.
  • I will grade your previous week’s work on Sunday night through Monday night or Tuesday morning (into the next week)–this  grading will happen in BB so you have a running record of how you’re doing for about 60% of the work for the class.

Week 2 Jan 16-22

Blog Post—DUE Thursday at noon (Jan 19)

Thing to Read:

Download Basic Writing by George Otte and Rebecca Williams Mlynarczyk from the WAC Clearinghouse web site in their book list. http://wac.colostate.edu/books/basicwriting/

Reading Assignment:

  • The Introduction
  • Chapter 1: Historical Overview
  • Chapter 2: Defining Basic Writing and Basic Writers

Writing for the Blog:

Write a blog post of at least 500 words in which you reflect on the text you’ve read in one of three ways: text-to-self (your own connection to what you’ve read/your personal reaction); text-to-text (how you might connect the text to other texts you’ve read, movies, short films, etc.); text-to-world (what connections do you see between the text and the world at large, out there, beyond the academy). You should also think about the way the authors wrote these chapters. You may focus on structure, presentation of information, and so on—as long as you say something about HOW the writer does what the writer does. When you read like a writer, you start to observe how arguments and information are created through the stringing together of words and sentences, using punctuation, charts, graphs, etc. This is reading for writerly prowess, rather than for content. In these blog posts, write NO SUMMARY. EVER. These response bits should clearly demonstrate your thinking about what you read (or watched), not a summing up of what you read (or saw). We’re reading it too, so summary isn’t necessary. Quoting from the material to then elaborate upon it, isn’t summary, btw–it’s smarty-pants and if you include this regularly, you will really be learning about scholarly writing, attribution, and thoughtful synthesis (all things you should be doing and then teaching students some day).

You must offer a thoughtful response to the writers in your group for the week–through comments in the blog. Response Groups will be posted on our Secret Facebook page. These will change about every three weeks.

Objectives being met by reading and blogging responses:

  • Acquire knowledge of basic writing pedagogy and learn multiple ways of applying that knowledge to learning environments.
  • Learn about open education resources across the internet which allow all socioeconomic levels to access quality materials for learning about writing.
  • Redefine and revise what it is to be a “basic” writer (because we all are in every new discourse community we enter–in some ways–basic).
  • Learn to communicate and write in online environments, such as Facebook and WordPress (including Blackboard), then apply to teaching or coaching situations.

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Writing for FB—Due Friday at noon (Jan 20)

Please post a few sentences about what you read, what you think, questions you may have, things that bugged you, things not clear, anything that you thought was magnificent, insightful, horrible, awful, painful, shocking. Multiple sentences meant to engage your readers and spur them to conversation. What is a few sentences? More than 5 sentences, up to 10 sentences? Maybe. From short to long in length (from 5 words to 35 words???). It all depends how concisely you can say a thing you want to say. You want to say something meaningful to make it possible for your peers to engage with you… Keep that in mind.

Objectives being met through Facebook Interactions:

  • Learn about open education resources across the internet which allow all socioeconomic levels to access quality materials for learning about writing;
  • Create materials which can be used to empower basic/beginning/striving writers in post-secondary writing environments (college, work, life);
  • Redefine and revise what it is to be a “basic” writer (because we all are in every new discourse community we enter–in some ways–basic).
  • Learn to communicate and write in online environments, such as Facebook and WordPress (including Blackboard), then apply to teaching or coaching situations.

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Writing BB Reflection—DUE Sunday at 8 pm (AND your responses to peers on blogs and in FB are also due at this time)

This is a reflective, metacognitive bit about what you learned over the course of the week, from your own reading and writing, and from that of your peers (you’ll be required to read/respond to at least the work of two other peers every week before you write this piece). This will get loaded up to BB where it will prompt my grading of all three weekly projects: Blog, FB and BB reflective writing.

Objectives being met through reflective writing:

  • Create materials which can be used to empower basic/beginning/striving writers in post-secondary writing environments (college, work, life);
  • Redefine and revise what it is to be a “basic” writer (because we all are in every new discourse community we enter–in some ways–basic);
  • Learn to communicate and write in online environments, such as Facebook and WordPress (including Blackboard), then apply to teaching or coaching situations.

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Week 3 Jan 23-29

Please read these two articles which can be found at the below site:

  • “Introduction,” Mina P. Shaughnessy
  • Putting Error in Its Place,” Isabella Halsted
  • One of your choice from this journal

http://wac.colostate.edu/jbw/v1n1/

Please blog about what you’ve found that’s intriguing (text-to-self, text-to-text, text-to-world), and then the next week we’ll begin Mina Shaunghnessy’s Errors & Expectations. You will find MUCH from this journal to compare to her book as we go along.

400+ words for these blog posts. Also FB posts to have conversation, then on Sunday night a 400+ reflective essay that connects what you thought with what your colleagues thought–or go beyond and read an additional something from JBW to kick it up a notch. OR go back and read more in the Otte and Mlynarczyk book. Read another chapter and make your reflective essay ooze with synthesis. The same basic rubric applies to all, except the word count for the blog post and the reflective essay are 400+ words. Please note that word counts will change from week to week going up and down by 100+ to 200+ words on occasion (that’s writing practice, y’all).

As well, next week, you’ll be reading another article from JBW which will continue to contextualize early (mid-1970s Basic Writing pedagogy). Fun.

Due dates will appear here and on the check list when we have decided a final time for FB posts that is reasonable for working humans.

Week 4 Jan 30-Feb 5

Please read the first four chapters in Errors & Expectations by Mina Shaughnessy (chapter 1 is the intro). If you don’t have the book yet, you really need to get it, BUT you need to know what’s up: so go here. This is NOT a substitute for the book, but times are tough. Even if you have the book, it can’t hurt to see an overview. It’s not the best look into the text, but it’s not awful–and there is a good bit at the end about those who criticize the book.

Blog Focus: I’d like you to focus on what Shaughnessy says she did to get the data she got and make the suppositions she makes. Do you agree with her thus far? What doesn’t make sense to you? What seems out of step with our life and times? What implications does her work have for digital writing, if any? How do these first few chapters help you think about your own writing and propensity for certain error? What seems to be missing from this work?

As always, you have:

  • a blog post due (500 words this week)–by Thursday at noon,
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm),
  • and a reflection (500 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm.

And as always, you should, as I will, adjust the rubrics to reflect the numbers of words required. The general quality always remains the same.

(And as I noted on FB–interaction matters. Comment on the blogs in your groups. Talk on FB–post quotes and say something about them. Ask questions. Go beyond the easy post or response. It’s a grad class for most of you–go big, be big, ask for big, push big. Be kind, always, but ask questions of your peers and yourselves. Engagement is what makes an online class WAY better than a correspondence class. Engage.)screen-shot-2017-01-31-at-2-59-48-pmWeek 5 Feb 6-12

This week, you should finish Shaughnessy’s book: Chapters 5, 6, 7, 8.

Blog Focus: What you should focus on in your blog post this week is a reflection on what you think is still valuable in the book? We’ll be reading critiques and up-to-date scholarship on BW, but this is the foundation. What’s worth holding onto here? I would say, OBVIOUSLY, the course she lays out is not at all a writing course, but how could you use it? What are her cautions in wholly adapting or adopting what she’s done? And talk about whatever else you want to in order to wrap up this text).

FB: If you could get any one group to read this book, who would it be and why? (Do have a back/forth conversation about this on FB, and please, please, please someone pick university professors as your group.)

As always, you have:

  • a blog post due (400 words this week)–by Thursday at noon,
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm),
  • and a reflection (400 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm.

Week 6 Feb 13-19

Read these articles, in this order (you will find .pdf copies in our BB course for you to download):

  • “On the Academic Margins: Basic Writing Pedagogy” by Deborah Mutnick (2001) in A Guide to Composition Pedagogies (Oxford UP), edited by Gary Tate, Amy Rupiper, Kurt Schick.
  • “Basic Writing Pedagogy: Shifting Academic Margins in Hard Times” by Deborah Mutnick and Steve Lamos (2014) in A Guide to Composition Pedagogies (Oxford UP), edited by Gary Tate, Amy Rupiper Taggart, Kurt Schick, and H. Brooke Hessler.

Blog focus: I request you read in this order because it is chronological. NOW, your focus can be on–what changed from 2001 to 2014 from article to article. What do the authors say about Shaughnessy? About other BW pioneers? What’s the big concern in 2001 and in 2014? And anything else you want to focus upon.

As always, you have:

  • a blog post due (500 words this week)–by Thursday at noon,
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm),
  • and a reflection (500 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm.

Week 7 Feb 20-26

Reading:

Back to Basic Writing by George Otte and Rebecca Williams Mlynarczyk from the WAC Clearinghouse web site in their book list. http://wac.colostate.edu/books/basicwriting/

You’ve already read Chapters, Intro through 2. Please read Chapters, 3, 4, 5. Also please review at the appendix.

Writing:

As always, you have:

  • a blog post due (500 words this week)–by Thursday at noon, this should be focused on comparing what you read of Mutnick/Lamos and Mutnick, Shaughnessy with the rest of this text by Otte/Mlynarczyk (2010). The date for this book is in the middle of the Mutnick articles, so you should get some good perspective on the field from the rest of the books (along with the Mutnick/Lamos article from 2014). In your blog, it’s probably time to put in something at the end that says who all these people are. Just a list. Like: Mina Shaughnessy was… George Otte is… Steven Lamos is… that simple. You need to know who they are. Also, want to find out who the other folks were who you read? Do it. That’s going for the A.
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm), for this, I’d like you to dig into the appendix of the Otte/Mlynarczyk book and find a resource you can look at–please give a focused assessment of your resource–in other words, don’t repeat what O/M said in a very general way, but dig into what’s there and tell us about a particular bit that would be useful for you. This is sort of like an annotated bibliography–but make it pertinent to our class and as you know a bit about each other, please recommend this to any of the class you think might benefit from your thinking. Do comment on your group members’ posts first, but since this FB bit is about the whole class, please go outside the expected and talk to everyone as you can.
  • and a reflection (500 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm.

Week 8 Feb 27-Mar 5

This book will be our focus for several weeks since we have spring break in there! I’ll ask you to read the three parts over the next three weeks, dig deep, compare to what we’ve read, what you’ve experienced, write a literacy narrative (with three parts), and review the appendices and pick one to highlight on FB and in your reflection (as part of the last week).

The book is Reconnecting Reading and Writing by Alice S. Horning & Elizabeth W. Kraemer. It’s available for download for free from here.

Please read Part I: Overview this week. It’s not a whole whole lotta much but I want you to do a LOT of reflecting on what you’ve read and see how the field is responding in terms of reading and writing. I especially want you to dig into the International Reading Association–NOW called the International Literacy Association. (It’s not just about reading anymore. Like it ever was.)

So read the first part part of the book, the Overview, then dig into this online resource for the ILA:

https://www.literacyworldwide.org/

What do you find here? So is the main audience? How do the meet the needs of their audience? What’s here for YOU as potential BW teachers focused on writing? It’s one thing to say, we need to students to read more and read better, it’s another whole thing to actually teach reading. What do they publish, what conferences do they offer and for whom, what is available online?

You should have a sense of what BW is or can be–and it’s history. NOW start connecting BW to ILA initiatives, mission statements, etc.

A good place to begin for writing statements is here: http://www.ncte.org/positions/writing

Now think about how you might answer these questions: How could you mesh writing and reading into one class? Why would you want to?

The scope is huge on this week, so find a few points to focus on so you can make the topic yours and make sense of what you want to learn.

Please focus your blog on some compare/contrast with BW and ILA and what ILA clearly does that could enhance BW. Answer questions above as you can. (500 words or more by Thursday at 8 pm.)

For FB, a post and responses to others between TH and SUN night. If folks in your group haven’t posted, respond to whoever has posted–this is also true for responding to blog posts.

Reflection: focus on YOUR literacy narrative. Tell me the story in Part 1–how you learned to read or some aspect of reading that’s important to you, a key reading event in your life. Part 2–writing literacy narrative–same kind of thing but focused on writing. How you learned, overcame fear, or focus on a key writing event. Part 3–how are reading and writing connected for you–1200 words by Sunday 8 pm. Connect as you can to what you’ve learned about BW, and now reading, to inform what you experienced. This is noticeably longer than previous reflections. However, if you’ve already written something like this, you may recycle that writing, but make it apropos for this assignment and its three parts.

As always, you have:

  • a blog post due (500 words this week)–by Thursday at noon,
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm),
  • and a reflection (1200 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm.

Week 9 Mar 6-12

Reading: Reconnecting Reading and Writing by Alice S. Horning & Elizabeth W. Kraemer, here. Part II.

  • a blog post due (500 words this week)–by Thursday at noon–you pick the focus of your blog post,
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm), you pick the focus,
  • and a reflection (500 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm, a reflection of what you focused on this week.

Week 10 Mar 13-19 (Spring Break!)

Reading: Reconnecting Reading and Writing by Alice S. Horning & Elizabeth W. Kraemer, here. Part III with appendices.

No writing is due.

Watching: Looking at the creation of knowledge outside the academy–mostly:

  • A Remix Manifesto–movie.
  • Everything is a Remix–series of short videos.

You need to watch these–details will get added with links to watch free online or download for free.

Week 11 Mar 20-26

This week you’ll write about Part III in the Reconnecting book, here.

Here’s your focus: You are a “developmental” program director. You are tasked with reconnecting reading and writing. Make up three “basic” classes with some kind of theme in three levels–I, II, III–a very beginning, the next level, and the third level (is this a comp 1 equivalent? you decide!) and some assignments or hints at assignments so HOW the courses might play out is obvious. Really I’m looking for an thorough “vision” rather than the meat and potatoes of this. No need for a schedule with weeks/days/dates. I want you to be the visionary based on what you’ve been learning. Think of the levels of basic articulated in our readings and then weave in ideas about writing and reading and… go.

What might this look like? Be creative. Look at similar things online. Email me. I have examples I’m happy to share, but I’d really prefer you create something to explain your thinking that’s not modeled on something I’ve done. I will talk details with you, gladly, any time.

  • a blog post due (1000 words this week is what I’m thinking, but it could easily go to 1500)–by Thursday at noon–this is the three classes executive summary description thing.
  • a FB post (between Thurs noon and Sunday 8 pm), share the appendix you focused on and what you learned by going a bit deep there–ask questions,  we love that.
  • and a reflection (500 words)–by Sunday night 8 pm–this is where you talk to me about how it felt to have to create something that connects BW and reading and whether you felt successful or not and if you think you could actually implement your design for a three-class sequence.

How would you weave what you learned about “remix” into the classes you are starting to design? Think about it. You could really love what you think up! Don’t forget to attribute where you got your inspiration.

Week 12 Mar 27-Apr 2

  • This week is there is no specific focus for the blog due–your choice of topics. (500 words)
  • FB with visual rhetoric, and a reflection. I’ll get you assignments asap so you can start to think on this work as you can. Should be fun. Will relate to the film and video series.
  • Reflection is about your upcoming research project–sort of an initial proposal/exploration. (500 words)

Week 13 Apr 3-9

Research: scholar studies or program case studies (for grad students) or book reviews (for undergrad). Directions for these assignments will be forthcoming.

  • Blog to update us on your progress.(300-500 words)
  • FB to ask each other questions about research or share sources.
  • Reflection is a draft of some part of the research project.(300-500 words)

Week 14 Apr 10-16

Research: scholar studies or program case studies (for grad students) or book reviews (for undergrad).

  • Blog to update us on your progress. (300-500 words)
  • FB to ask each other questions about research or share sources.
  • Reflection is a draft of some part of the research project. (300-500 words)

Week 15 Apr 17-23

Research: scholar studies or program case studies (for grad students) or book reviews (for undergrad).

  • Blog to update us on your progress. (300-500 words)
  • FB to ask each other questions about research or share sources.
  • Reflection is a draft of some part of the research project. (300-500 words)

Week 16 Apr 24-25

Final projects due on blog. Details will be forthcoming regarding requirements: content/length, etc.

Dead Day Apr 26

Final Exams Apr 27, May 1-3

“Exit” reflection due on blogs. “Goodbye” due on FB. Details of this TBA.